2017-08-02 / Sports

Gabby’s fishing fever

Set fishing ‘pattern’ and stick with it
By GREG ‘GABBY’ CAUDILL


Fishing columnist Greg ‘Gabby’ Caudill with a nice six-pound catfi sh he caught after identifying a “fishing pattern” at Georgia lake. Fishing columnist Greg ‘Gabby’ Caudill with a nice six-pound catfi sh he caught after identifying a “fishing pattern” at Georgia lake. Many basic things about fishing that will never change, and good fisherman know these things and use them to catch fish when others seem to not do as well.

There are also much more complicated parts to fishing, such as most types of bass fishing and fishing with artificial bait instead of live bait. Fishing patterns, seasonal movements, spawn cycles, weather changes and cold front effects on fish behavior are very important but are not understood by all fisherman.

One thing experienced anglers know about is what is called “fishing in zones.” This is when you break down different areas of the lake and fish those areas in a certain way. This helps eliminate unproductive water and focus on areas that hold better numbers of catchable active fish.

As an example, we were fishing in the state of Georgia a few weeks ago in very hot temperatures. The only shade on the lake was very tight to the bank, so we made this area the “zone” in which we did our fishing. It paid off big, as we caught several big bluegill and a few bass. I also caught a really nice channel catfish that weighed about six pounds and measured 23 inches. If we had fished outside this shaded area we would not have done any good. So this is the zone or area we fished that day.

The next day the temperature was much cooler and the weather much milder and the fished moved back out and scattered over deeper water. Thus, our fishing zone changed to shallow areas next to deeper water or where cover was close by.

Taking time to find your zone greatly improves your chances of finding and catching fish.

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