Whitesburg KY
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Clips from available Mountain Eagle pages since our founding in 1908




 

 

August 24, 1933

Voters in Kentucky will vote on November 7, general election day, on the question of repeal or retention of the 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which bans the manufacture, sale, and transportation of alcohol.

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Heavy financial losses over the past three years have resulted in Whitesburg losing one of its most beneficial businessmen and one of the town’s best families, writes Mountain Eagle editor Nehemiah M. Webb. J. B. Mullins is giving up all his property here to move to Pound, Va., where he will start a new small business. According to Webb, a store building Mullins owns in Whitesburg, which Webb calls “the best in the city,” and “every scrap” of the family’s “vast property holding are being ripped from them and going for their debts and will probably not bring, when put on sale, anything like half of what it is worth.” Added Webb: “Such ripping by debtors at such a time can hardly be tolerated.”

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Membership in the Letcher County chapter of the Farmer’s Union Club is now more than 70. The purpose of the Union, which held its regular meeting at Blackey Wednesday night, “is to put farming, gardening and other agricultural interests back on their feet again and stimulate life into the only methods by which hope and prosperity can come back to the finest of farming sections in the county.”

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Writing about the “desperate conditions” the Great Depression has brought to Letcher County, Eagle editor Webb commends state officials and the administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt for their efforts to provide relief to the citizens here. Writes Webb: “… Numbers of mistakes were made. People not entitled to help were probably helped, some of the money spent was probably wasted by being put into projects that were useless, but the work was done and money went to quiet the nerves of some poor mother and furnish a meal for some poor children, all of whom were in no sense responsible for their poverty-stricken condition. … Generally, unemployment prevailing for over two years has brought on the desperate conditions. The coal companies had exhausted their every means to feed their thousands of men in their camps. The whole truth is without the relief furnished, deaths would have resulted from starvation and exposure.”

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Mr. and Mrs. C.M. Bowen and children left early in the week for Chicago, where they will spend several days enjoying the World’s Fair. Also taking in the “great fair” are Mrs. Alpha Hart and two little daughters who left on an auto trip to Chicago.

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Celebrating the 26th anniversary of his founding of The Mountain Eagle, editor/publisher Webb writes that “26 years ago on the last Thursday in August, down on the then ramshackle Main Street in what was known as the ‘Manerva Brashears Home,’ the first few copies of The Eagle were run off the press. It was a hazardous venture, and those who looked over its pages said, ‘Well, it’s different, but it, too, will be dead in a few months.’ Only a few people were willing to slap us on the back an say, ‘Go at it, Nehe, you can make it go.’ And so it trudged along, stumbling and halting, all day and all night.” Of the paper’s future, Webb wrote: “If I should never write another line or offer another word of encouragement to my countrymen and their children I should be satisfied. Why? Because I believe I have done my part. But I want The Eagle to go on. The fields are still white to the harvest. The task is not yet finished.”

August 26, 1943

The memory of an outstanding hero of World War II will be honored Monday, August 30, in Whitesburg when Mrs. Millie Hart will receive a Silver Star decoration awarded posthumously to her son, Private First Class J. Hugh Hart, who was killed in action in the African campaign. A citation from the Army says the Silver Star, the third-highest military decoration for valor, is being awarded to Private Hart “for gallantry in action. When a concentration of enemy artillery fire delayed his battalion’s advance, Private Hart, although under direct fire, remained at his gun and placed accurate counter-fire on enemy batteries until mortally wounded by an exploding shell. Throughout this action, the courage and determination displayed by Private Hart exemplified the highest traditions of the Service.”

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Yerkes Saylor, of Benham, is in critical condition in the Lynch Hospital and Rufus Herald and W.M. Tuttle are lodged in the Letcher County Jail as a result of what was described as a drunken brawl and shooting which took place about 12:30 a.m. Tuesday at Rose’s Whiskey Store on Cumberland River. Witnesses say an argument began over some girls and the shooting took place as a result. Herald allegedly shot Saylor with a gun provided to him by Tuttle, of Harlan. Sheriff Gilbert Polly and deputies brought the suspects to the Whitesburg jail.

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Mr. H.E. Mauk of Whitaker visited the offices of The Mountain Eagle last week to buy subscriptions for three sons in the service and one son in defense work in Los Angeles. Mr. Mauk is a shoemaker by trade. Serving in the military are sons Pfc. Charles E. Mauk, somewhere in the Hawaiian Islands, Pfc. Winfred N. Mauk, somewhere in Australia, and Pfc. Eugene C. Mauk, stationed at San Pedro, Calif. Son James Irvin Mauk works in the shipyards in L.A.

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A 30-year-old Camp Branch man has died of illness he contracted five years ago while serving in the U.S. Army. Monroe Cloud died last Friday morning at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chow D. Cloud. He was honorably discharged from the service in February 1938.

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Mrs. Martha Breeding of Isom was surprised when her son, Staff Sgt. Van Breeding, stepped off the bus last Saturday, August 21, for a one-night stop at home. Sgt. Breeding, who has been in the Army Air Corps for three years, was en route from Waco, Texas to Chicago and was able to land in Lexington. He just recently resumed duty after a long hospital confinement because of a spinal injury.

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Former Jenkins High School football coach Andy Miracle, now a lieutenant in the Army Air Corps, escaped narrowly after the B-17 Flying Fortress bomber he was piloting over Germany was badly shot up, knocking out three of the plane’s four engines. Able to glide the plane from an altitude of 20,000 feet, Lt. Miracle landed the bomber in the English Channel, five miles from England’s shore, where he stood on a wing and directed the transfer of his entire crew to rubber rafts. Not a member of the crew was lost and they were all picked up about 40 minutes later by the English air-sea rescue. After entering the U.S. Air Corps, Lt. Miracle transferred to Canada’s Royal Canadian Air Force to get into action. After completing his training there, he was transferred back to the U.S. Air Corps and was seeing plenty of action in England. He and his crew had shot down four German airplanes when they were attacked.

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The Costello Air Craft Institute of Springfield, Illinois is seeking 100 women from the area — white only — for good paying aircraft jobs.

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Lana Turner and Robert Young star with Walter Brennan in the movie “Slightly Dangerous,” playing at the Kentucky Theatre in Whitesburg on August 29-30.

August 27, 1953

Pfc. James C. Duncan is the first soldier from Letcher County to be repatriated in the Korean War prisoner exchange. Pfc. Duncan is now aboard the USNT General Hase, which is due to arrive in San Francisco on August 29. Duncan attended Whitesburg High School and was reared by his grandmother, Mrs. Lizzie Duncan, who passed away recently unaware that her grandson was about to be released as a prisoner of war. Pfc. Duncan volunteered for the service in 1947 and was taken prisoner in December 1950 after being overseas for 14 months. Young Duncan received the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy near the Chosin Reservoir in Korea on November 28, 1950. A citation said that during battle, Duncan “disregarding his own safety, ran to the strong point of the enemy, using his carbine and hand grenade, thus neutralizing the enemy’s position immediately.”

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The opening of the new Fleming-Neon Grade School has been delayed until Tuesday, September 8. Because of minor construction delays, the new building will not be ready to open by the previously scheduled date of August 31. Fleming-Neon High School will open as scheduled on the 31st.

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A 73-year-old Fleming man has died of injuries he sustained after being hit by a car while crossing the street in front of his home near the Fleming hospital. Riley Little died en route to the Jackson hospital, where he was being taken by ambulance. The driver of the car, 19-year-old Raymond Maloney, had no operator’s license and was taken to the Letcher County Jail. Maloney’s car also had no brakes. Little had served as night policeman in Fleming for many years.

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For the first time ever, the Letcher County Board of Education has published a complete financial report in The Mountain Eagle of the receipts and expenditures of the school system for the previous operating year. Supt. Dave L. Craft was the first to follow the state law requiring publication of financial reports. (Editor’s Note: The reports are still required to be made public today. However, after heavy lobbying by the Kentucky School Boards Association, the law has been changed to allow school systems in Kentucky to bury the reports deep in their own websites, where they are seldom, if ever, viewed by the public.)

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An employee of the Riverside Café and a passenger in her vehicle suffered painful injuries after an accident about 1 p.m. Tuesday while driving on Thornton Road. Dixie Williams and her passenger, Mrs. Rosana Lucas, were admitted to the Fleming hospital after their car crashed head-on into a coal truck driven by Earl Adams and owned by Melvin Adams. The car, a total loss, is owned by Ray Williams, brother of Miss Williams. The coal truck was only slightly damaged.

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Patrick Boggs, 63, of Jenkins, is one of three brothers who were reunited in Whitesburg recently for the first time in 60 years. Patrick and brothers Garland H. Boggs, 72, of Los Angeles, and J. Walter Boggs, 67, of Charleston, S.C., were separated after the death of their mother, Mrs. F.M. Boggs, in Tate Springs, Tenn., in 1893. Their father, F.M. Boggs, died shortly after Patrick was born in Cumberland. “I was in Whitesburg when the streets were all dirt and there were only three or four stores,” remembers Walter Boggs. “A great change of course has taken place, since at that time there were no electric lights, no railroads, no cars, no telephones, and no paved streets. A very small population lived here at that time.”

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The states of Kentucky and Virginia, under a bill recently passed by Congress, are authorized to establish an interstate commission to help develop the Breaks of the Big Sandy area in eastern Kentucky and southwestern Virginia. The Breaks, long known for its scenic beauty, is a 1,600-foot gorge cut by the Russell Fork of the Levisa Fork of the Big Sandy River. The area under study lies between Elkhorn City in Pike County and Haysi, Va., in Dickenson County.

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Mrs. Hank Williams, “the girl for whom the nation’s top song hits were written,” will appear onstage on September 4 at Isaac’s Ultra-Modern Alene Theatre of Tomorrow in downtown Whitesburg. Beginning at 1 p.m. and running continuously throughout the day and night, Mrs. Williams will sing songs by her late husband, including “Cold Cold Heart,” “Love Sick Blues,” “Jambalaya,” and “Wedding Bells.” Paul Howard of Grand Ole Opry fame and the Arkansas Cotton Pickeds will back her.

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A 16-year-old Deane boy died this morning after being injured while cutting timber. J.B. Blair, son of Ercel Blair, had been cutting timber for his father when the accident occurred about 8 a.m.

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Mr. and Mrs. Albert Farley entertained last Saturday with a birthday party in honor of their son, Bill Andy. The party was given at the home of Bill Andy’s maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Frye in Jenkins. Guest helping little Bill Andy celebrate his third birthday included Margaret Ingleheart, Chi Chi Morin, Martha Jane Greer, Nancy Ann, Bet and Richard Storey, Dickie Tucker, Jimmy Riley, Bennie Lester Bentley, Stevie Litts, Duard, Bobby and Edna Lee Harris, Stevie Blevins, and Barbara and Jimmy Bellamy. (Editor’s Note: Mr. Farley now covers local government affairs for The Mountain Eagle.)

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Public assistance recipients in Kentucky last fiscal year drew a total of $38,353,776, some $3,500,000 more than during the preceding year, the state Department of Economic Security reported today. The state’s three public assistance programs are Old Age Assistance, Needy/Blind, and Dependent Children.

August 29, 1963

The City of Jenkins has received a $278,000 grant and a $303,000 loan to aid in construction of a sewer system. The grant and loan come from the Community Facilities Administration. Earlier the federal government announced a $439,170 grant from the Accelerated Public Works program and a $226,240 loan from the Community Facilities Administration to pay for construction of a sewage treatment plant in Jenkins.

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The Fleming-Neon Pirates defeated the Whitesburg Yellowjackets in the football season-opener for both schools. The final score was 32-12. The Jenkins Cavaliers also won, overwhelming the Wheelwright Trojans 64-6.

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School bells signal the end of vacation for children, says Millstone correspondent Mabel Kiser, but they mean the beginning of one for their mothers.

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Mrs. Ralph Bates Jr., owner of the Style Shoppe in Whitesburg, said this week she will move her business October 1 across the street from its present location into the Tom John building on Main Street. Baker Maytag vacated the building several weeks ago.

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Final preparations are being made for the weeklong Letcher County Agricultural and Youth Fair, which will begin Monday, September 9 and will feature music by the Stanley Brothers and the Clinch Mountain Boys on September 12. Four hundred dollars will be given to Letcher County residents for prize exhibits of farm produce, 4-H, FFa, FHA, civic club displays, flowers, handicrafts, etc. The fair will be held on the Whitesburg showground near the ball field in Whitesburg. Carnival rides will also be provided.

August 30, 1973

The national shortage of newsprint, the paper on which newspaper are printed, continues to be a problem for newspapers including The Mountain Eagle. An article in the Eagle asks correspondents and advertisers to get their copy in early so the paper can meet an early press deadline, but warns it is not known where or when the next issue can be printed.

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The United Mine Workers of America, under the newly elected leadership of Arnold Miller and Mike Trbovich, has voted to pay strike benefits to miners in Harlan County. UMWA miners at Eastover Mining Company at Brookside, owned by Duke Power Co., are on strike.

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”The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come” outdoor drama, based on the novel by John Fox Jr., is scheduled every Friday, Saturday and Sunday at Van.

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Rock, a dog owned by Hade Burns, won a trophy for treeing a coon in a coon-on-a-log contest, reports Blackey correspondent Charles Ann Mullis. She says the dog treed the coon in spite of suffering from a sore foot.

August 24, 1983

Several wells belonging to Letcher County families have dried up, and the City of Jenkins is under a “boil before drinking” notice because of a water shortage caused by a drought. County Extension Agent Paul Morris said normal rainfall for the first six months of the year was 29.5 inches. Only 23.28 inches of rainfall were recorded in the first six months of 1983.

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The Orlando, Fla., Utilities Commission is preparing to sign a 10-year contract with Blue Diamond Mining Co. to supply coal to the electric utility the city owns.

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Letcher County has apparently escaped the outbreaks of hepatitis and tuberculosis that have been reported in neighboring counties. Knott County officials are trying to discover the source of 61 cases of hepatitis. In Pike County there are 19 cases of tuberculosis.

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Mr. and Mrs. Claude Williams of Dayton, Ohio, formerly of Millstone and Thornton, celebrated their 55th wedding anniversary.

September 1, 1993

Former Letcher County Circuit Judge Larry D. Collins pleaded guilty to one of five bribery charges. He is scheduled to be sentenced Oct. 22, 1993. Collins pleaded guilty to taking money and marijuana from a man in exchange for promising to keep him out of jail.

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Enrollment in the Letcher County School System dropped 6.3 percent from the previous year. It had dropped 9.9 percent from the enrollment in the 1986- 87 school year.

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David Dixon wrapped up the 1993 racing season with a win in the model feature at Mountain Motor Speedway at Isom. Eddie Carrier was second, and Larry “Smokey” Collins was third.

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Eastern and southcentral Kentucky are still the poorest part of the Appalachian region, according to the Appalachian Regional Commission. The commission says the per capita income in seven Kentucky counties is less than half of the national average.

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For a third time, teachers at Martha Jane Potter Elementary School have defeated a proposal to establish a school-based decision making council at the school.

September 3, 2003

A Letcher County grand jury has indicted seven persons as a result of an eight-month undercover drug investigation by the Letcher County Sheriff ’s Office. All are accused of selling drugs to informants working for the sheriff ’s department.

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The Hemphill Community Center unveiled its Letcher County Miners’ Memorial at a ceremony August 30. The black-marble monument includes the names of more than 300 miners who have died on the job.

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The Whitesburg Yellowjackets defeated Morgan County 36-20. The Fleming-Neon Pirates fell to Clay County, 20-0.

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Custom cars and mini-trucks will be hopping, skipping and jumping down Main Street in Whitesburg Friday night. The event is the opening ceremony for the Heritage 2K3 Reload car and mini-truck show. The event is the second annual show held to raise money for a Christmas toy drive sponsored by Mountain Comprehensive Health Corporation.


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