Whitesburg KY
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Clips from available Mountain Eagle pages since our founding in 1908




 

 

July 20, 1933

Robert Moore, 35, formerly of Rockhouse, was shot and killed earlier this week by a woman at Cumberland who has been identified only by her last name of York. “The killing is said to have resulted from a deal with a small check and a few bottles of home brew,” the Eagle’s front-page report said. “The woman was arrested and taken to the jail at Harlan. She says she was in danger of her life from Moore when she fired the shot which resulted in his death.”

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Earl Bach, a pilot from the flying field at Jackson, and two passengers in the plane he was flying escaped injury Sunday after a crash landing at the landing field at Eolia. Bach landed the plane in a cornfield near the Eolia landing ground, striking soft dirt and causing the plane to turn upside down. The uninjured passengers were Mrs. Charles Passmore and her son, Jack.

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The Kentucky Theater is cooperating with Whitesburg merchants for a promotion in which prizes will be dropped from an airplane piloted by Earl Bach, who will fly “The Eagle and Hawk” place over the city’s business district at 4 p.m. on Saturday. Bach will drop 30 prizebearing parachutes, 12 with prizes sponsored by Whitesburg merchants, ranging from a coupon for a free chicken dinner at the Daniel Boone Hotel or a coupon for five gallons of gas from Salyer’s Service Station. The remaining 25 parachutes will hold guest tickets to the Kentucky Theater’s showing of “The Eagle and the Hawk,” a war film starring Fredric March and Cary Grant.

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A Mayking man, Nelson Kincer, 28, was run over by a freight train and seriously injured this morning, apparently having been knocked under the train by a man or men attempting to burglarize the Mayking commissary where Kincer was a night watchman.

July 15, 1943

A 27-year-old McRoberts man met with tragic death in front of the Neon Post Office last Saturday night or during the very early hours of Sunday. Officials said Powers and his wife had been arguing, and that the wife followed him to Neon and got into a car in which Powers was riding with a U.S. sailor on leave. An argument was started and a .22 rifle was in the car. Powers then suggested to his friend that they go into a nearby restaurant for a cup of coffee, which they did. Upon leaving the restaurant, Powers took the gun from the back seat of the car and, without checking to see if it was loaded, began to break the gun up. While doing so, Powers took hold of the barrel and swung the gun into the sidewalk curb, at which time the gun discharged and struck him in the abdomen. He was rushed to the Fleming hospital, where X-rays showed the bullet had lodged in his spinal cord. He died about 25 minutes after being wounded. Survivors included his wife and three children.

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A 17-year-old McRoberts girl died at Jenkins hospital Saturday night from complications of yellow jaundice.

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Defective wiring is said to be the cause of a fire that destroyed the home of John Griffin in the Cumberland River area of Letcher County. The home was one of the oldest remaining in Letcher County, having been built in the 1840s by the late Elder David Maggard, a well-known pioneer settler and preacher in Letcher County.

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Miners on Tuesday ended a month-long strike at the Elkhorn-Jellico Coal Co. operations at Marlowe. Cleanup work began Wednesday and a full force was cutting coal this morning (Thursday). Details of the settlement are not known at this time.

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The price for a subscription to The Mountain Eagle has been raised to $2.00 a year from $1.50. A six-month subscription is now $1.25. “The pitiful sum of $2.00 per year will not even begin to pay for the expense and output of The Mountain Eagle,” writes publisher W.P. Nolan. “Therefore we see no reason why any person should complain about the price of the paper.”

July 16, 1953

A long illness has resulted in the death of M.D. “Mart” Lewis, one of southeastern Kentucky’s most prominent businessmen and founder of Lewis Wholesale Company of Whitesburg. A charter member of the First Baptist Church in Whitesburg, Mr. Lewis started the wholesale company after teaching school in the Jenkins area. He was 82.

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Letcher Schools Supt. Dave L. Craft reports several changes in the operation of the county school system. Craft says the changes are the result of the loss of children leaving the coalfields with their parents who are being forced to move elsewhere to earn a living. According to Craft, 889 children have left the county during the past year, creating a loss in school revenue of more than $36,000. Craft said the student population loss will result in the consolidation of several small schools into larger ones. Elementary schools no longer in operation when classes begin August 3 are Oven Fork, Collier’s Creek, Frank’s Creek, and Indian Creek. The Neon and Fleming grade schools will also be closed since construction of the new consolidated Fleming-Neon Elementary School building is complete. Students in 7th and 8th grades will now transported to the new Fleming-Neon school from grades schools at Haymond, Potter’s Fork, Tolliver Town, Seco, Little Creek and Hemphill.

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Warning that he will go after lawbreakers just as vigorously at the end of his term as he has since he took office nearly four years ago, Letcher County Sheriff Hassel Stamper has announced the arrests of nine bootleggers in Letcher County, each of whom has confessed and ordered to pay fines.

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Mrs. Jennie Combs Coldiron of Whitesburg, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Combs Sr., has graduated from the Alex Adams Agency, where she was voted outstanding model in her class. Mrs. Coldiron won honors from John G. Powers of the Power Modeling School in New York, and recently made her television debut on the Marion Giffert Show on WHAS-TV in Louisville.

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Paschal Fields of Whitesburg is a Republican candidate for constable in District One. “I will have no deputy under me and [there will be no] fee grabbing for four years,” says Fields. “Just try me and see.”

July 18, 1963

Whitesburg Attorney Harry M. Caudill’s book, Night Comes to the Cumberlands, is receiving highly favorable reviews in major newspapers and magazines including the New York Herald Tribune, Harper’s Magazine and The Washington (D.C.) Star.

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”The Interns” and “Tarzan’s Fight for Life” are playing at the Alene Theater in Whitesburg.

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Letcher County has been declared a disaster county to receive help in reclaiming and restoring land damaged by excessive rainfall or flooding in March 1963.

July 19, 1973

Paul Morris is the new county agent for the Letcher County Extension Service.

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A Mountain Eagle editorial comments on a bill proposed by the House Interior Subcommittee on the Environment and Mines and Minerals, saying, “We were pleasantly surprised” with the tough strip mining bill. The editorial also says, “The House committee bill is not the world’s greatest, but it doubtless is the best we are likely to get. So let’s start writing our senators and congressmen and President Nixon, and let them know we want to see the bill enacted and signed into law.”

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”Everyone is busy taking care of garden stuff,” writes Roxana correspondent Alma Whitaker. She reports people are making kraut, canning beans and pickles, picking berries, taking up onions, and doing the many other things you have to do around a farm.

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The Crusade for Christ drew a large crowd in Letcher County. Evangelist Eddie West spoke nightly at the gathering.

July 14, 1983

Achievement tests show Letcher County students performing far below their peers statewide. Local scores rank 171st among the state’s 183 school districts.

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A Mountain Eagle editorial on the low achievement test scores says, “We sense a growing disenchantment with the mediocrity of our schools. This atmosphere gives us a chance to improve them. We’re cheating our children if we let this chance be squandered in sniping, carping, patronage politics or narrow political ambitions.”

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Police seized 90 marijuana plants with a street value of $30,000. The plants were all five to six feet high, police say. No arrests were made.

July 21, 1993

Citizens interested in preventing the destruction of Fishpond Lake have organized the Fishpond Development Committee. Members oppose plans by Manning Coal Corporation to strip mine the area around the lake.

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”We are all pleased with the good rain we got here,” says Cowan correspondent Elsie Banks. “It was much needed and will be a big help to the gardens.”

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Members of the Letcher County Historical and Genealogical Society marked the organizations third anniversary. Librarian Sybil Galer says the Historical Society’s collection, which is housed in the public library in Whitesburg, is drawing researchers from other states and is a main attraction at the library.

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Three things are unavoidable, according to Eagle columnist Ike Adams — death, taxes and crabgrass

July 23, 2003

Members of the community and other Kentuckians remembered the lives of two influential Letcher Countians at a groundbreaking ceremony held at Southeast Community College in Whitesburg. The new academic/ technical building is being named in honor of Belinda Mason, the late AIDS activist and writer. Her father, the late State Rep. Paul Mason, fought for and obtained the appropriation of money for the new building just before his death in 1998.

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The Fleming-Neon City Council this week rebuffed attempts by Mayor Harlan “Tootie” Seals to triple the amount of city funds he can spend without the council’s prior approval.

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Letcher County Fiscal Court voted to participate in hiring a regional economic development director, but there’s a catch. The county can only do it if it gets a guarantee that the state will reimburse it the $35,000 cost.


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