Whitesburg KY
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Clips from available Mountain Eagle pages since our founding in 1908




 

 

April 15, 1943

Doctors at the Jenkins Hospital now believe a young Isom man will survive critical injuries he received after being stabbed in a restaurant. Cooley Combs was stabbed by two men who became angry after being thrown out of the establishment after demanding Combs buy them a beer. The suspects, Hamon and Wiley Amburgey, were charged with cutting and wounding. Combs suffered three bad wounds near his spine.

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Snow and freezing temperatures on Wednesday have damaged Victory Gardens and fruit crops throughout Letcher County and eastern Kentucky.

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Two Letcher County men, Sheriff Gilbert Polly and Kirby Ison, have purchased property known as the Quillen property located just below Whitesburg, where the high school football field is now located. The property is considered one of the most valuable tracts in the area and believed to be the only suitable location for a football field. “We believe, along with many other citizens, that Whitesburg should make a strenuous effort to retain that part of the property where practically all of the athletic activities have taken place,” The Mountain Eagle says in a commentary announcing the purchase. “If we are to lose the football field, what is to become of school athletics? One thing for sure, we either go forward or backward. We leave it for you to decide.”

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The U.S. Selective Service announced Tuesday that it plans to induct into the service every able-bodied male between the ages of 18 and 37, except the following: 1. Men employed full-time in essential farming; 2. Men irreplaceable in essential non-agricultural jobs; and 3. Men whose induction would mean “extreme hardship and privation” to dependents. The Selective Service said the changes are intended to postpone drafting fathers into the armed forces for “as long as possible.” However, officials also indicated fathers will have to start being inducted by about July 1 to meet the goal of raising the size of U.S. forces to 10.8 million troops.

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Capt. Mark Webb Adams, youngest of four sons of Mr. and Mrs. J. Wash Adams, has been promoted to Major. He is a graduate of Stuart Robinson School, Blackey, and Centre College in Danville.

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In an advertisement opposing the coming May 30 election on whether legal liquor sales should be outlawed in Letcher County, the Kentucky Distillers’ Association points to FBI statistics that show crime is higher in states where communities are dry.

April 16, 1953

The Bank of Whitesburg is suing Letcher County businessman Sam J. Bates, his wife Elizabeth Bates, the Kentucky Department of Revenue, and the U.S. Department of Revenue for $364,116. The bank hopes to satisfy the debts owed by Mr. and Mrs. Bates by selling tracts of property the couple own, including eight lots in the Collins-Harvie Addition in Whitesburg, a tract on Main Street in Whitesburg, and two tracts on College Hill in Whitesburg.

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The Office of Director of Internal Revenue, Louisville, says the agency has seized several tracts of real property from Letcher County businessman Sam J. Bates and his wife Elizabeth Bates, doing business as Star Elkhorn Coal Company of Whitesburg, and will sell them at public auction because of non-payment of taxes. The auctions will be held May 6 in Blackey, McRoberts and Whitesburg, where the properties are located.

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The Kentucky Department of Motor Transportation has granted Cro C. Caudill and A.J. Fields, operators of the Caudill & Fields Bus Line of Kingscreek, authority to operate a motorbus line from Whitesburg to Gordon, a distance of 20 miles. Buses can serve all intermediate points but are subject to closed-door restrictions over KY Highway 15. Fields was also granted a certificate to operate a motorbus line from Linefork to Whitesburg over highways KY 160 and 15, a distance of 32.7 miles. It too is subject to closed-door restrictions over KY 15.

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Kentucky Department of Highways officials announced this week they will take legal action against people who are found to be dumping garbage along state rights of way. A highway official in Pikeville also warned Letcher County and eastern Kentucky residents to stop encroaching upon state rights of way by plowing and planting gardens, saying the practices will no longer be “tolerated.”

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Eight seniors for Kingdom Come High School returned home recently from a class trip to Washington, D.C. The students rode to Washington in two cars belonging to the school principal and basketball coach. While there, they toured the White House, the Washington Monument, the Smithsonian Institute, the Library of Congress, the Supreme Court Building, the Bureau of Printing and Engraving, and the Capitol Building. On their way back to Kentucky, the students visited the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and Mount Vernon.

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Kingdom Come High School held its junior-senior class banquet April 3 at Pine Mountain Hotel. All girls and boys were dressed formally. The menu consisted of Swiss steak, mashed potatoes, peas, carrots, spring salad, hot rolls, butterscotch pie and ice cream. An old-fashioned square dance was held after the banquet.

April 18, 1963

Whitesburg Chamber of Commerce president Dee Dawahare says the chamber hopes residents of the Carr Creek and Linefork sections who are scheduled to be flooded out of their homes by new dams will move to Whitesburg.

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A consolidation plan which calls for three new grade schools, including one at each end of Whitesburg, has been proposed for the Letcher County School System by the State Department of Education. The plan approves the construction of a new elementary school at Cowan and an addition to the grade school at Eolia. Other projects recommended, in order of importance, are: the purchase of a site for the Kona-Millstone school; construction of the Kona-Millstone school; construction of West Whitesburg Elementary and purchase of East Whitesburg Elementary site; construction of East Whitesburg Elementary; and construction of gymnasiums at Fleming-Neon and Letcher High schools.

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Nearly 5,000 people have received their first dose of Sabin Oral Polio Vaccine in Letcher County, but another 7,000 need to be immunized to eliminate polio in the county, according to the Letcher County Health Department.

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Congress Carl D. Perkins spoke at the dedication of the new Neon Post Office.

April 19, 1973

Two new stores, S-Mart and The QRS, held grand openings in Whitesburg.

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The first major court battle to emerge over strip mining in the Appalachian mountains has resulted in a victory for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the strip-mining industry. The court ruled that TVA’s need for low-priced coal outweighed the requirements of federal law that agencies of the government detail the impact their practices have on the environment. Two environmental organizations, Save Our Kentucky and Save Our Cumberland Mountains, had sought an injunction to halt TVA from purchasing strip-mined coal.

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Millstone correspondent Mable Kiser reports that the temperature has been 20 degrees. She says, “This is too cold for the fruit to live and we fear about 75 percent or more of it is already killed.”

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James Bond films “Dr. No” and “From Russia With Love” make up the double feature at the Alene Theater in Whitesburg.

April 21, 1983

A sudden drop in temperatures brought record snowfalls for April and record low temperatures to the mountains.

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The Kentucky state auditor recommends that Letcher Fiscal Court require more “financial accountability” of organizations which receive donations from the court.

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Ice correspondent Sara C. Ison says she and her husband, Clarence, had gone hunting for mushrooms, “wild eggs” or “dry land fish.” She reports that their timing was perfect and they found a skillet full.

April 21 1993

An ordinance to regulate oil and gas drilling will be presented to Letcher Fiscal Court by Kentuckians for the Commonwealth. The proposed ordinance would create a five-member oil and gas licensing commission and require drillers to submit an application to drill to that commission.

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Senior Airman Ronnie J. Sturgill, son of Billy J. and Frances C. Sturgill of Eolia, is in Somalia with the 3rd Aerial Port Squadron, Pope Air Force Base, N.C. The American soldiers are there to ensure convoys of food reach their destinations safely. Battling warlords have destroyed buildings, water lines and power lines.

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Two Whitesburg High School basketball players, Amanda Baker and Hilary Swisher, have been named to the Kentucky All-Star team.

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Faulty wiring is being blamed for a fire that destroyed a portable classroom at Cowan Elementary School.

April 23, 2003

A special judge has ruled there is not enough evidence to refer charges against two oil and gas drilling company employees to a grand jury. One of the men had been charged with first-degree criminal mischief, a felony, and operating a vehicle over 30,000 pounds on a county road, a traffic violation. The other man had been charged with complicity to first-degree criminal mischief, a felony. The men had been accused of damaging a county-maintained road at Woodrock.

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Mayor Harlan ‘Tootie’ Seals wants the city council to declare Fleming-Neon a “groundhog sanctuary” and make it illegal for anyone to harass or kill the creatures.

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Two burglars made a poor choice when they picked a house to break into at Whitco. The people who live there are Letcher County Sheriff Danny Webb’s mother and sister. Webb said his sister saw someone run away from the house and jump into a Ford Ranger. She wrote down the license number, and Webb arrested two men for second-degree burglary.


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