Whitesburg KY
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Community calendar

November 27 — The Southeast Kentucky Chapter of the National Black Lung Association will meet at 2 p.m. at the Letcher County Health Department, 115 Madison St., Whitesburg. The meeting is open to the public and everyone is welcome to attend. Staff members of the Respiratory Clinics of Eastern Kentucky and local attorneys with experience with federal black lung claims will be at the meeting to provide information and answer questions. For more information, contact Anthony Warlick at (606) 633-4871 or awarlick@mtncomp.org.

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November 27 — The quarterly meeting of the Kentucky River District Board of Health will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Holiday Inn Express,192 Corporate Dr., Hazard.

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November 30 — The First Baptist Church of Greeneville Children’s Choir will sing at the SmileFaith Comm. Center, 9599 Hwy. 805, Jenkins, (the yellow building next to Jenkins Library) at 7 p.m. Light refreshments will follow. The event is contingent upon the weather. For more information, call (606) 821-7883.

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December 1 — The Letcher Elementary School Christmas Bazaar will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the school gymnasium sponsored by the LES PTO. The bazaar will feature handmade crafts and vendors include Tupperware, Rodan & Fields, Color Street Nails, Perfectly Posh, Southern KY Trends, Scentsy, Paparazzi Jewelry, Lilla Rose and Nerium. Admission is $1 or two nonperishable food items. Hotdogs, chili, chips and cheese will be available.

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December 1 — The Jenkins Christmas Parade will be held at 5 p.m. in downtown Jenkins. Line-up for floats begins at 4 p.m. at the library. For more information, call (606) 205-7821. After the parade, Santa can be found at the Jenkins Fire Department, where people will get to meet him. After meeting Santa, the festival committee will have treats. The new officers for 2019 are President Jesse Profitt, Treasurer Lynn Bentley, Vice President Joann Baldwin and Secretary Paulette Sexton. may be an annoyance in a developed country is a major problem in undeveloped areas of the world; Kenton Lee is working on changing that. As a volunteer in an orphanage in Kenya, he noticed that many children had the toes cut out of their shoes just so they could fit in their growing feet. After returning home, Lee developed an adjustable sandal that can grow with a child, increasing up to five sizes using a system of snaps. Although the shoe is only available to nonprofits that send them to organizations in need, domestic demand is increasing. If you’re a parent sick of buying seemingly endless pairs of new shoes, you’ll be glad to hear that Lee and his team are working on a commercial version. (c) 2018 King Features

Syndicate, Inc.

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