Whitesburg KY
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Girl also prepared for invasion



I read the article in The
Mountain Eagle
Jim Cornett wrote about digging foxholes during World War II in case the Germans and Japanese invaded his hometown. I found this story very interesting. It touched me and inspired me to write my own story.

I was a little girl, about five years old. I was very smart and remembered most everything I had seen or heard whether I understood it or not. Growing up I lived off and on with my grandmother and grandfather, Siah and Nancy Cornett. They lived at Linefork, up a hollow called Long Branch. Their home was about halfway up the mountain. I could stand on their front porch and holler or sing really loud and hear my voice echo back from the other side of the mountain.

Everyone talked about the war, and what if the Germans or Japanese would fly over and drop a bomb on us. Lots of people were very scared that this could happen. When my grandparents and I talked about this, it would scare me to death also. I would run out behind the house and cry. Then one day I thought, “What if it should really happen? Where would I go? What would I do? Where would I hide to keep the enemy from finding me?”

Well, there was this big hole underneath the house that my grandfather had dug. He called it the ‘tater hole.’ He put his potatoes and fresh vegetables in it during the wintertime so they would not freeze. It was about five feet deep and four feet wide, and had plenty of room for me to hide in. I could get under the feed sacks he used to cover his potatoes and the enemy could never find me. As for food, I would have all the potatoes and vegetables he had stored away. But you know, I’m so glad that the invasion did not happen, for I could have been in that tater hole a long time. You see, that could have been my foxhole, even though I did not dig it.

Jim, I’m glad you and your friend did not have to stay in your foxhole either. But if you had to, I’m sure you would have survived some way.

We were kids then, and we had great imaginations. But we were also survivors in whatever the situation was. How long could we have held up in our foxholes? Well, I guess we’ll never know.


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