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Jackson National Weather Service forecaster Anthony Edwards honored




Forecaster Anthony Edwards of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Jackson National Weather Service office is a recipient of the agency’s Regional Isaac M. Cline Award for 2007. Edwards was recognized for outstanding achievement in the hydro-meteorology category for creation and development of the drought program at the Jackson Forecast Office, and for his contributions to the local fire weather program.

The Isaac M. Cline Award honors individual employees and teams for operational excellence in the delivery of products and services in support of the National Weather Service mission. Awards are presented on the local, regional and national levels.

“Tony Edwards demonstrated outstanding initiative, creativity, technical proficiency and teamwork creating and implementing the drought program here at the Jackson forecast office, and also in completing a study of red flag fire weather patterns in the central Appalachians,” said Jackson forecast office meteorologist-incharge Shawn Harley said. “He employed a variety of skills to provide internal and external access to drought information as well as training other forecasters in both areas of operation.

“Tony’s efforts culminated in outstanding customer service for product users, local officials, media and the public looking for drought information on the WFO Jackson web pages. To top everything off, he did a significant amount of research and development on his own time.”

The award is named for the man credited with saving thousands of lives during the Galveston, Tex., hurricane of 1900. Isaac Cline was in charge of the U.S. Weather Bureau office in Galveston when the city was struck with the deadliest natural disaster in the nation’s history. The death toll exceeded 8,000, but could have been much higher if not for Cline’s acute understanding of the weather and his early hurricane warnings in an era when meteorology was in its infancy and ship-to-shore communications were non-existent.


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