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Says heroin dealers deserve no sympathy



To the Editor

We are at war.

A war that is not being fought on distant shores, but a war being waged in our towns, in our schools, and in our playgrounds.

You cannot hear the cannons roar or the bombs exploding, only the screams of children as the enemies of all humanity strike like vile serpents. Silently, cowardly they slither in amongst us seeking their prey — your children, my children. They want children to sink their fans into — to foul their precious blood with their poisonous weapon.

Their weapon is heroin.

Heroin is a weapon of hate. It is held by those who hate the world and everyone and everyone in it. Creatures that go by the names Taliban, ISCL and Al-Queda. Their minions here in Kentucky are no better than their owners spreading misery and death. These Kentucky dealers do not look at a schoolyard full of happy children the same way you and I would. All they see are human slaves or products to be turned into profits that their masters will convert into guns, bullets, and bombs. Kentucky heroin dealers deserve no sympathy. They do not want understanding. All they want is to take our children, drain them of life, and murder them.

The dealers laugh at the feeble laws currently on the books in Kentucky for drug trafficking, knowing their profits are safe from criminal prosecution. They brag about how many children they have killed because, according to Kentucky law, they can’t be charged with murder if one of their victims overdoses, especially a child. But their biggest howls of laughter are at the Kentucky General Assembly’s feeble attempts at anti-heroin bills that never pass. This year’s tepid attempt at a bill is supposed to be a compromise without any harsh penalties for the bad guys. (No, no, we must not make the dealers mad or hurt them in any way. We must compromise and give them therapy. Harsh punishments don’t work. We must give them soft pillows and new coffins for their victims.) We must rehabilitate the dealers. The General Assembly would have us believe that with enough therapy, time and money, any person could be rehabilitated. Like any farmer could transform a slaughter-ready steer into a prizewinning bull through therapy.

A compromise, by definition is, “an agreement made to adjust or settle by mutual concession.” I wonder who the legislature made concessions with — the dealers — the Taliban. What guarantees did the dealers make? We know for a fact that guarantees made by the sons of Satan guarantee nothing. A perfect compromise would be a true anti-heroin law that contains stiff sentences (greater than 40 years without the possibility of parole for any amount of heroin), mandatory death penalty for heroin overdose deaths in those under the age of 16, and treatment programs for those willing to give up their dealer.

If we make the stakes high enough, the sewer rat dealer will want to leave Kentucky, especially if we enable our law enforcement personnel the tools to go after and capture the rats anywhere. We can do this, because:

• By eliminating the distribution and sale of heroin in Kentucky we can save the lives of countless children.

• We can eliminate the crimes associated with heroin.

• Deny the Taliban and its mentally ill cohorts the means to child pornography, child prostitution and the promotion of violence.

We cannot afford to lose this war. The General Assembly must act, and act with force. Or more U of L cheerleaders and innocent children will die at the hands of those without mercy, pity or compassion.

DAMIAN C. BEACH
Payneville



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