Whitesburg KY
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The way we were

Clips from Mountain Eagle front pages over the past 50 years

August 11, 1960

The Mountain Eagle
is now a “tabloid size” newspaper, which means the page size will be about half what it used to be. The paper is also printed by a new process. During the past week, a Harris LTG off set press has been installed.

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N.L. Combs of Daniels Branch reported a very unusual sight on his farm pond. About 150 white cranes stopped over for a few days swimming and roosting in nearby trees.

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Last year’s starting backfield and 12 other returning letter men seem to indicate that Jack Hall’s Pirates will be the team to beat this 1960 season.

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Whole frying chickens are 29 cents a pound at the A&P food store in Whitesburg. Cornish hens are 45 cents a pound.

August 13, 1970

Whitesburg City Council voted this week to permit construction of a recreation center for young people on city-owned property next to the swimming pool in West Whitesburg. City Councilmen James Reynolds and Joe Newell explained that a newly organized Whitesburg Youth Council is beginning a campaign for funds to build a 60 foot by 100 foot building for youth activities.

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The Whitesburg High School Class of 1929 held its reunion in Whitesburg last weekend, and all but one of the graduates (the late Walter Enlow) returned to visit with old friends.

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Nathan Baker is the new chief of Whitesburg’s police force.

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The snakes and the insects had banded together and declared war on the Sherd Martins or vice versa. This summer the Martins have killed eight copperheads (four in one day), four blacksnakes, and two cow snakes. They also tore up three yellow jacket nests, two of them in one day.

August 14, 1980

State cutbacks in education might make free workbooks, laboratory supplies, and crayons a thing of the past in Letcher County classrooms, school officials say. Both the Jenkins and Letcher County school systems now have $5 per pupil with which to buy student supplies instead of the $20 per pupil they had two years ago and the $15 they expected to have this year.

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DLM Coal Corp., a subsidiary of General Energy Corp. of Lexington, has filed suit in West Virginia against Mountain Stream Monitors, a group which tests streams for sulfuric acid contamination; the group’s president, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the federal Office of Surface Mining. The suit is the outgrowth of a letter published by Mountain Streams Monitors saying that acid drainage from a DLM mine has destroyed more than seven miles of native trout streams.

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Squirrel hunting season is to open on Saturday. The squirrel population is up noticeably in eastern Kentucky but is down in the rest of the state.

August 15, 1990

A Letcher County grand jury has recommended that the county government “take whatever steps are necessary” to keep the county jail open and to build a new jail. State officials are threatening to limit the jail to a 72-hour holding facility unless the county can demonstrate it has “immediate plans to build a new jail.”

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South East Coal Co. has warned more than 800 workers they could be laid off in October as a result of the company’s current legal battle with its largest customer, Kentucky Utilities Company. Letcher County officials say the closing would be “devastating” to the county.

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The Letcher County Board of Education has dropped plans to establish a middle school in the old Hemphill School building.

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Letcher County schools will begin collecting a 3-percent utility tax in October.

August 16, 2000

The Letcher County Fiscal Court has turned down flood insurance by a vote of four to two.

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U.S. Rep. Harold “Hal” Rogers is praising Letcher County for its progress in cleaning up, citing as examples a demonstration sewer project at Millstone and sewer line extensions now beginning in Whitesburg and Neon.

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The six seats on the Blackey City Council come up for re-election in November, but no one filed to run. The deadline for filing for the fall election passed at 4 p.m., August 8.

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Premier-Elkhorn Coal Co. faces fines from two separate state agencies for a release of muddy water from a strip mine at McRoberts on August 8. Muddy water from Premier-Elkhorn’s Mine 35 rolled off the mountainside about 9 a.m. and covered the road in Tom Biggs Hollow before flowing back into the stream.


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