Whitesburg KY
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The way we were

Clips from Mountain Eagle front pages over the past 50 years

September 8, 1960

Whitesburg’s police and fire chiefs told city council this week that the city is having increased problems with juvenile delinquency and they are hard pressed to know how to cope with the situation.

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Dock E. Adams won $1,000 for a cost-reducing idea he submitted on salvaging brazing cooling tubes at the General Electric Company plant where he works in Louisville. He is a son of W. Howard Adams and a graduate of Whitesburg High School.

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A major division in the largest religious denomination in the Southern Appalachian Highlands took place last week at the annual meeting of the Indian Bottom Association of Regular Baptist near Hindman. At the business section of the association, 11 churches were challenged as being “out of order.” Eighteen were approved as in good standing. The issue was the rule against “fellowship”, which prohibits preachers of the Indian Bottom Association preaching in churches of any other association.

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Franklin D. Roosevelt Jr., son of the late President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, will visit Letcher County next month. He will speak in behalf of the Democratic presidential ticket of Sen. John F. Kennedy and Sen. Lyndon Johnson.

September 10, 1970

The shortage of railroad cars continues to plague the coal industry in eastern Kentucky. Several Letcher County coal operators said they were receiving only enough railroad cars from the Louisville and Nashville Railroad for two days’ mining. As a result, several mines with coal orders sufficient to work five or six days a week expect to have to curtail production sharply in the near future.

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The possibility has developed that the Little Shepherd Trail can be extended from Whitesburg to Jenkins and beyond in the near future. County Tax Commissioner Sam C. Webb, a longtime leader of the Little Shepherd Trail Association, said the state may have $500,000 or $600,000 on hand, which could be used for the extension toward Jenkins.

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Whitesburg City Council members will appeal to the state to build a new bridge across the L&N railroad tracks at the east end of Whitesburg. The present bridge, which dates back many years, is maintained by the railroad, but was closed last week by city officials after motorists noticed it was sinking in one spot. Closer inspection revealed that a main supporting beam had split and that the bridge was in danger of collapsing.

September 11, 1980

State officials are in Jenkins trying to come up with some solution to the city’s week-long water shortage, which offi cials have termed “critical.” The Jenkins City Council has declared an emergency because many people have been without water since Saturday. A combination of leaking pipes, too little rainfall, and an increased demand for water had taken its toll on the city’s reservoir and left the water in the lake too low for adequate use.

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Several hundred coal miners employed by U.S. Steel mines in Lynch marched on the coal company offices in what is one of the most unusual ‘job actions’ in the eastern Kentucky coalfields. The miners, members of United Mine Workers Local 7425, are demonstrating against layoff policies of the coal company. U.S. Steel, they say, is laying off miners with half a dozen years of seniority on the job and keeping new employees.

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When Arnold and Gladys Kincer of Neon returned from a Florida vacation, they found that their home had been vandalized and burned and many possessions are missing or damaged.

September 12, 1990

Letcher County officials have challenged the official U.S. Census count in the county, saying it is much too low. Census figures indicate that the population of Letcher County and much of eastern Kentucky has dropped dramatically. The count shows that from 1980 to 1990 the county lost more than 12 percent of its population — nearly 4,000 persons, and that Jenkins lost 16 percent of its population, which was down from 3,271 to 2,750. Whitesburg had gained 109 residents and its population rose from 1,525 to 1,634.

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Mandatory garbage pickup still hasn’t reached all areas of Letcher County.

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Seven persons are to be inducted into the Mountain Heritage Hall of Fame at a banquet this week. They are the late William R. Adams, Dave L. Craft, Hassie B. Helton, the late R.N. Swisher, Letcher Judge/Executive Ruben Watts, the late Remious Day, and the late Dr. T.M. Perry.

September 13, 2000

Letcher County will lease the former Swannee tipple at Isom to a start-up industry that plans to manufacture metal products for other industries and promises wages of $12 an hour plus benefits. The Letcher Fiscal Court voted to lease the former coal tipple to Process Systems for $1,000 a month. But the lease comes with discounts, based on how well the company lives up to its promises.

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Groundbreaking ceremonies for the new U.S. Post Office at Whitesburg will be held at noon on Sept. 20 at the site near Pine Mountain Grill.

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The Whitesburg Yellowjackets, led by a pair of touchdowns and 145 yards rushing from senior Canaan Pennington, rolled up a whopping 474 yards in off ense in pounding Perry County Central 48-6 to remain unbeaten. The Fleming-Neon Pirates rebounded from a two-game losing streak to upset visiting 14th ranked and unbeaten Paintsville 28-10.

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The Letcher Fiscal Court approved a resolution Monday night asking federal and state highway officials to restrict truck traffic on U.S. 119 between Whitesburg and Eolia. The vote came as a result of a request by residents of the Cumberland River area who are fighting to improve safety on the road while they wait for a new road to be built.


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