Whitesburg KY
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The Way We Were

Clips from available Mountain Eagle pages since our founding in 1908


 

 

Thursday, January 20, 1944

Virgil Smith, the Georgia farmer who predicted the correct date for the end of World War I, says the present war will end on Easter Sunday, 1944. Smith, who makes his predictions from dreams, said three months before the end of the First World War that it would be over on November 11, 1918. He even predicted correctly how that war would end and how peace terms would be arranged. This time, he is further predicting that the world will be “war proof” – that this will end all wars and that the U.S. will have the leading voice in arranging “everlasting” peace.

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Eli Miller, an 84-year-old man who came to Jenkins to work in the mines as a coal loader in 1915 and frequently won the title of “high tonnage man” at Consolidation Coal Company’s Mine 206, died at the Jenkins Hospital after complications from pneumonia. No known relatives survive him.

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Authorities say a 15-year-old boy accidentally shot and killed his little sister while the boy was cleaning a gun. According to Letcher County Coroner Archie Craft, the boy did not know the gun was loaded when he began to clean it on the first floor of the family’s home at Cumberland. The gun went off, firing a bullet through the ceiling that fatally wounded the little girl who was lying in her bed taking a nap in a second-floor bedroom. The wounded child died upon arriving at the Benham hospital, Craft said.

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The Kentucky House of Representatives voted 95-1 this week to approve a proposal by Gov. Simeon Willis to set aside $3 million for raises for public school teachers. Rep. Adron Doran, a Democrat from Wingo, said the money his bill would provide an average raise of $20 a month to all teachers in Kentucky. The House this week also approved a bill lowering the age limit for bus drivers from 21 to 18.

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Dr. R.H. McFadden of Whitesburg, formerly of Chester, S.C., has accepted a position with Dr. B.F. Wright at the Seco Hospital. Dr. McFadden practiced urology at the base hospital at Langres, France. He also served as regimental surgeon at Camp Lee, Va., during World War I.

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J.M. Feltner, 4-H Club field agent for eastern Kentucky, died January 13 at his home in London after suffering a heart attack. Mr. Feltner, 67, was scheduled to be in Whitesburg January 31 for a meeting of the county extension agents.

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Pvt. Harry Caudill sent a telegram to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cro Caudill of Whitesburg, letting them know he made it overseas safely and has reported for duty.

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An explosion in a “wagon mine” near Seco has left two brothers seriously injured. Mining official W.M. Hall said the explosion occurred after a shot failed to go off properly. “This mine was operated in of state mining laws, having no compensation insurance or foreman,” said Hall. He said the mine is owned by Daniel Quillen and Henry Lewis.

Thursday, January 21, 1954

The names of 24 Letcher County men who lost their lives in the Armed Forces during the period of hostilities in Korea are included in a list compiled by the University of Kentucky. They are: Troulus Adams, A.C. Anderson, Billy Blevins, Ray Brown, James Collins, George Cline, Bobby Combs, Jack Hughes, Denver King, Billy McFall, Charles Meeks, David Miles, Elmer Mullins, George Riley, William Roark, James Roberts, Thomas Scott, Herbert Smallwood, Willie Smith, Donald Tackett, Simon Terry, Ira Trent, James Webb, and James White. So far, UK offi- cials have collected the names of 1,095 Kentuckians who met death in service during the Korean campaign (June 25, 1950 through July 27, 1953).

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If the United States lowers the voting age to 18, as President Eisenhower proposes, it will fall in line with the practice of only four other major countries — Mexico, Argentina, Turkey and the Soviet Union.

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A new report from the Kentucky Department of Education says attendance in the Jenkins Independent School District ranks first among the state’s 227 school districts. Jenkins Supt. C.V. Snapp attributes the high attendance rate — 96.09 percent — to the work of the district’s attendance officer, Homer C. Davis.

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Coal production in the Hazard field for the current year is 201,650 tons through January 16, down from 286,350 for the same period in 1953 but still marking the second straight year of production reaching at least 200,000 tons.

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A new lunchroom and billiards parlor is being established in Neon under the management of Bascom Peters and Phil Bowen. The new business is located next door to Peters Electric Shop. A prize of $10 is being offered the person furnishing the best name for the business.

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Coffee prices may soon jump to $1.06 per pound, offi- cials with the A&P food stores and other national grocery chains have announced. National brands now sell for 99.9 cents per pound. “It costs us $1.01 a pound to buy Maxwell House coffee,” said one official. “You can’t make any money taking a two-cent loss.”

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Dr. Sam W. Quillen, a Neon dentist and president of the Neon-Fleming Lions Club, is calling on all businesses, organizations and private citizens “interested in the betterment of the county” to hold a countywide meeting for the purpose of organizing to bring new industries into the county. “We need a definite program working toward set goals,” Quillen said on behalf of the Lions Club in a letter to The Mountain Eagle. “This cannot be obtained unless we can first have a general meeting and discussion group, but this is to be the beginning of an actual movement. It can be done here in Letcher County as it has been done in other counties in Kentucky if we are really interested and are willing to work.”

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Letcher County residents planted more trees last March than in any other county in Kentucky. Sixty-five people planted 100,45 seedlings in 1953. So far this year, 87,500 trees have been ordered for planting by 23 individuals and businesses. The Elkhorn Jellico Coal Corporation leads the way with the order of 23,000 short-leaf pines. Second is Roy Crawford, who has ordered 10,000 loblolly pines.

Thursday, January 23, 1964

The Board of Supervisors of the Letcher County Soil Conservation District has asked the Kentucky General Assembly to pass laws that would prohibit strip or auger mining in the eastern Kentucky coalfields. The board said the strip or auger method is “extremely destructive of land, the water and mineral resources; precipitates erosion on a vast scale; causes the silting up of streams and accelerates the run-off of rain from hills into the rivers, thereby contributing to the cause of floods which threaten the destruction of the cities of Whitesburg, Pikeville, Harlan, Hazard and Barbourville.”

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In his economic message to Congress, President Lyndon B. Johnson cut total federal spending, but asked for money to begin his “unconditional war on poverty” in America.

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The federal Urban Renewal Administration approved the final project report on the City of Whitesburg’s urban renewal project and authorized local project authorities to obtain necessary local approval for the project. Urban Renewal Administrator Don Brown says the federal government has set aside $487,191 for its share in financing the project. The city will pay its share through construction of new streets, sewer and water lines, sidewalks, curbs, gutters, etc. Part of this will be financed through a grant from the Accelerated Public Works Program.

Thursday, January 24, 1974

A Mountain Eagle editorial discusses a proposed new road across Pine Mountain, estimated to cost $27 million. The editorial says, “We want to see the road built. Pine Mountain, said to be the longest mountain in the world, serves as a kind of iron curtain separating the great Cumberland River valley area from the rest of eastern Kentucky.” But, says the editorial, “there is not too much point in a new road across the mountain unless it improves traffic . . . Proposed — believe it or not — is a $27 million, 30 miles per hour (that’s right, 30 miles per hour) highway! It would be a two-lane structure with a third lane for passing . . . It is horrible to speculate how many will be killed on a new but much slower 30 mph Pine Mountain road. A certain death trap.”

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Pork loin is 99 cents a pound at the A&P grocery store. Tomatoes, lettuce and celery are each three for $1.

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Ice correspondent Sara C. Ison asks her readers of they remember these old sayings: drunker than a biled owl; sober as a jug; hot as a flitter; coarser than a gritter; finer than frog hair; bitter as ditney; happy as a coon; poor as Job’s turkey; tight as Dick’s hat band.

Wednesday, January 25, 1984

Sub-zero temperatures and a seven-inch snowfall closed Letcher County schools.

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Congressman Carl D. Perkins visited Jenkins and urged city officials to finish preparing applications for federal money to finance a new water plant. “Let’s move and let’s not let anything in eastern Kentucky or anywhere else take precedence over this,” said Perkins. City officials met with Perkins to bring him up to date on efforts to obtain money to replace the city’s dilapidated, 71-year-old water plant.

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The Whitesburg Lady ‘Jackets, ranked third in the state, defeated Louisville Atherton 60-58 in overtime. The Fleming-Neon Pirates lost in overtime to Pikeville, 72-69.

Thursday, January 26, 1994

Letcher County schools remain closed after a weeklong winter storm. Two feet of snow remain on the ground on Bull Creek Mountain, and the county-maintained roads in the Cumberland River area. Linefork, the Blackey area and Hemphill are still in bad shape. Temperatures reached 20 below zero in Letcher County, and were below zero for two more nights.

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Cowan correspondent Elsie Banks writes, “We have all been on common ground — snowed in and trying to keep warm.”

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Eighty-year-old Kirby Whitaker was found unharmed after wandering away from his home. Twenty-five neighbors, volunteer firefighters and sheriff ’s deputies searched for Whitaker in 20-degree-below zero weather. Whitaker was found in a house just below his own house near Blackey.

Thursday, January 28, 2004

The Letcher County Food Pantry has received more than $9,000 in donations recently in addition to gifts of food and other items. After an article in The Mountain Eagle told of the financial problems facing the agency, Chairperson Jackie Joseph said, “the response from the people of Letcher County and former residents was overwhelming.”

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Letcher County School Board Member Tommy Vanover was arrested this week and charged with three counts of selling prescription narcotics. A fourth charge accuses Vanover, of Seco, will selling the controlled substance hydrocodone within 1,000 yards of the campus shared by West Whitesburg Elementary School and Whitesburg Middle School.

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Appalshop of Whitesburg has received two grants totaling $19,465 from the Kentucky Humanities Council for two film projects — one featuring Appalachian musicians from eastern Kentucky and the other investigation the relationship between people and electricity in the Appalachian region.


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