Whitesburg KY
Mostly sunny
Mostly sunny
75°F
 

The Way We Were

Clips from available Mountain Eagle pages since our founding in 1908


 

 

Thursday, January 29, 1914

The City of Jenkins is alive again, says Consolidation Coal Company manager E. Drennan. “We worked all our men four days the past week and next week will put them on full time, six days a week again and hope this keeps up in the future,” Drennan said during a visit to the offices of The Mountain Eagle.

.

John Blevins, 65, who killed Joseph Craft at McRoberts in late November, is in the Letcher County Jail after having been arrested in Eccles, W.Va. A jury has been empaneled in Letcher Circuit Court and will begin hearing testimony in the case against Blevins at 1 p.m. today.

.

Whitesburg-based Company D of the Second Infantry is one of only two companies in Kentucky’s organized militia rated as “excellent” by the Adjutant General. Meanwhile, Captain C.H. Back has ordered all members of the company to report to the Armory for inspection on February 9.

.

Neon merchant Max Mazer has announced the grand opening of his new store.

.

Every member of the Baptist Church is requested to be present at a special meeting in the Letcher County Courthouse next Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Pastor A.C. Hutson said the meeting is important and adds that “strangers are welcome.”

.

Mundy & Brady Railroad Contractors are laying track on Yonts Fork near Neon.

.

The Lee Driver murder trial scheduled to begin Tuesday has been delayed until April 4. Driver is accused of killing a Negro woman at Jenkins about a month ago.

.

The McGraw case tried last week in Letcher Circuit Court ended in acquittal after witnesses testified that the killing of James Hunley in McRoberts in December was an accident.

.

Business has been very much depressed in Burdine for the last few weeks, but the outlook is considerably better now. The scrip office has moved in the company store and the doctor’s office has moved into the former scrip office. Store personnel are looking forward to completion of the project to change the electrical current, which will supply the store’s elevator with “juice,” thus saving much toil on the part of the clerks.

.

Several revenue officers were in Burdine while searching all the camps for whiskey and beer. After rounding up a considerable amount of beer and whiskey, the beer was destroyed and the whiskey was seized by the agents.

.

Mrs. William Jenkins has arrived from West Virginia to join her husband, an official with Consolidation Coal Company and one of its most efficient workers.

.

The railroad extension along the North Fork of the Kentucky River is opening up a virgin coalfield of immense possibilities. No expense has been spared in building this new track in eliminating curves and cutting down grades so as to make it possible to haul heavy loads at a minimum cost. The region is growing in population in a remarkable way. There are half a dozen towns along this new line where a year ago there were only cornfields. The coal is thick and easily mined.

.

An appeal has been taken by John Bentley of Neon in the right-of-way proceedings of the Lexington & Eastern Railroad Company in which Bentley was allowed $19,700. Bentley says that last year he refused $50,000 for the property, consisting of about one acre in the town of Neon.

Thursday, February 1, 1934

In an editorial condemning the lynching in Hazard of Rex Scott, a young Negro male charged with a heinous crime, Mountain Eagle editor and publisher Nehemiah Webb said lynching is never okay but might be avoided if trials were conducted as speedily elsewhere as they are in Letcher County. “Had there been any likelihood of Rex Scott being brought to a speedy trial and swift justice, in some probability there would have been no lynching,” Webb writes. “Some weeks ago in Letcher County, two young men bought fare in a taxi and went with the driver up the way toward Neon. When about halfway to that town, one of them knocked the driver in the head, threw him out of the car, robbed him and drove the car on up the road. A few days later both men were arrested, and in another day or so both were on their way to Frankfort — the principal in the crime with 30 years to his credit, the other with 25 years hanging over him. Here is one example of the way to lesson lynching.”

.

Alonzo Blevins of Jenkins was tried in county court here Monday on a charge of testing eyes and practicing optometry without a state license. Judge Sandy Adams presided at the trial, which was prosecuted by Letcher County Attorney G. Bennett Adams. The defendant was represented by former Commonwealth’s Attorney J. L. Hays. In the end, Blevins pleaded guilty and was fined $5 after agreeing not to practice again without a license.

.

The old time raiding on moonshine stills in making a comeback. “When officers do their duty under the state and federal laws,” writes Eagle editor and publisher Webb, “those who persist in violations may as well get ready to live hard.”

.

Four young men from Linefork were sentenced to two years each in state reform school after being found guilty of breaking into a schoolhouse. “There is hardly any violation of the law regarded as so belittling as those who would rob, mutilate, or destroy school, church or public property, and yet there are those so thoughtless and depraved who will do this,” noted Eagle editor and publisher Webb.

.

Citizens of Letcher County joined with others across the U.S. on Tuesday night in celebrating the 52nd birthday of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

.

Robert Burke, indicted on a charge of killing his nephew, Bibbie Quillen, is expected to stand trial in Letcher Circuit Court on February 9.

Thursday, January 27, 1944

Captain Robert Kelly of Blackey was awarded his sixth Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Air Medal, the War Department has announced. The award was made for Kelly’s meritorious achievement while participating in antisubmarine patrol flights with the Twelfth Air Support Command in North Africa.

.

Construction work on two railroad extensions, tapping new and rich coal mining areas in eastern Kentucky at a cost of about $7 million, is expected to be completed early next year. The Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad is extending a line from Millard in Pike County along the Levisa Fork of the Big Sandy River to a point near Grundy, Va. The 28-mile project will cost a little less than $5 million. The Louisville and Nashville Railroad’s Leatherwood Creek Branch will tap a virgin coalfield being opened by Blue Diamond Coal Company on land owned by Kentucky River Coal Corporation. The line, beginning at Walter in Perry County and continuing 10.32 miles to the Harlan County line, is expected to cost about $2 million. Blue Diamond will build a 100-car tipple to serve its mining operations in that vicinity

.

Dr. J. E. Skaggs has announced his dental office will open for business on January 31.

.

Chief Petty Officer Dexter Dixon of the Seabees has reported back to duty at Camp Parks, California after spending the month of December with his family near Ulvah.

.

Kraft’s Macaroni & Cheese Dinner is on sale at A&P Food Stores for 9 cents a box. A 3-pound bag of Eight O’Clock coffee is on sale for 59 cents.

.

Corporal Forest Ison is home after being honorably discharged from the Army, where he served two years in Panama before receiving a medical discharge. Forest is leaving this week for Detroit, where he will continue to support the war effort by working in the defense industry.

.

“The one thing that the service boys seem to desire most is that when the war is over there is peace among the countries of the world forever and not World War III for another generation like in the past,” Sgt. Earle E. Combs, a Letcher County native, writes in a letter to The Mountain Eagle from “somewhere in England.”

Thursday, January 28, 1954

More than 35,000 disabled miners and their dependents will have their relief benefits discontinued in March, United Mine Workers President John L. Lewis announced last week on behalf of the Miners’ Welfare and Retirement Fund. According to Lewis, the pensions to retired miners will not be affected and disabled miners will still get all necessary aid to restore them to the best health and mobility. What is being cut out is the additional $30-a-month maintenance aid that the disabled miner has been receiving and the $10-a-month benefit paid for each of his dependents. The $1,000 death benefits will continue to go to widows of miners, but the widow will no longer receive the $30 maintenance and $10 monthly payment for each dependent. The UMW says it is the responsibility of the federal government to meet the payments that are being cut.

.

The Gulf Refining Company has opened a new filling station in Neon on grounds formerly occupied by the Neon Grade School. The station is operated by Jack Jenkins, a veteran of World War II.

.

The three-act play “Under the Western Skies” by Charles George is being presented February 5 and February 6 by students at Kingdom Come High School. Starrring in the play, which will be held in the school’s auditorium, are students Lowell Boggs, Verna Faye Ratliff, Bobby Lewis, Troy Cornett, Billie Sue Shepherd, Anna Cornett, Lee Boggs, Shirley Cornett, Delois Coots, Irene Lewis, Mabel Lewis, Estill Whitaker, and Phyllis Ingram.

.

Truck mining operations scheduled to resume February 1 will not start on that date after all, The Mountain Eagle has learned.

.

The design by Sherlock, Smith and Adams Architects of Montgomery, Alabama, for the proposed Whitesburg Memorial Hospital has won the Design Award in the Health Category in a competition held by Progressive Architecture, a national architectural magazine.

Thursday, January 30, 1964

Nearly 400 Letcher County students will benefit from a special school lunch program. The program is part of a federal emergency relief program for school children in eastern Kentucky, but school officials here say the program will continue beyond the current school year. Another 550 students in 17 schools will not get the school lunch program. The board of education left the decision on whether to join the new program up to the teachers in the schools, and teachers from 17 schools did not indicate any interest.

.

Life Magazine includes a 12-page section of text and pictures devoted to the problems of poverty in the Appalachian area. Life picked Letcher County as the focus of its story, and the people and scenes shown are all in Letcher County.

.

Ingrid Raye Adkins of Arlington, Va., formerly of Letcher County, was chosen Kentucky’s Cherry Blossom Princess at the Kentucky Society of Washington’s annual dinner-dance in honor of the Kentucky delegation in Congress.

Thursday, January 31, 1974

McRoberts correspondent Madelyn Combs says of the energy crisis, “With the gas shortage and all the gas stations closed on Sundays, we are not having as many visitors as usual. The price of gas and fuel oil is getting so high it looks like we are going to have to stay at home and go back to using coal for heating purposes.”

.

United Mine Workers President Arnold Miller labeled the energy crisis a “crisis of secrecy, greed and manipulation, but not a crisis of supply” and charged that major oil companies have deliberately held back on development of the vast coal reserves they control.

.

The Appalachian Regional Commission has created a new committee to explore and define the relation between culture and tourism. A member of the committee said, “For the people who live in the region, it is a way of life we are talking about. How do we begin to create on the part of Appalachia an awareness of its heritage, an appreciation not of something to run out and buy but something to continue to live with?” Only when culture is active, he said, “is it part of the living cultural history in the broadest sense.”

Wednesday, February 1, 1984

The Letcher County Fiscal Court declared the county’s roads in a “state of emergency” and asked Gov. Martha Layne Collins for help. According to a resolution approved by the court, severe winter weather and a loss of coal severance tax funds have combined to make many county-maintained roads virtually impassible. The county has asked Gov. Collins to supplement the County Road Aid Fund with an emergency appropriation for the State Road Fund.

.

The Whitesburg Lions Club, which had been dormant for two years, has been reactivated. Cossie Quillen Sr., a member of the old club and also of the new, said the former club existed 25 or 30 years before it was discontinued.

.

The Whitesburg Lady ’Jackets brought a six-game winning streak of the Fleming-Neon Lady Pirates to an end by defeating them 58-48. The Lady Pirates had raised their record to 10-5 with a 45-40 victory over the Cumberland Lady Redskins.

Wednesday, February 2, 1994

Letcher County is being threatened with $25,000-aday fines if the county’s new garbage transfer station and old sanitary landfill at Millstone isn’t brought up to meet state environmental standards by Feb. 4. Officials with the state Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet visited the Millstone site and ordered the county to fix the transfer station so it is operating properly and to clean up the mounds of garbage lying around the facility.

.

The 10-inch snow that hit Letcher County Jan 17 has finally melted and with it went some of the county’s rural roads. A change in temperature from a low of 20 degrees below zero to a high of nearly 60 degrees above has left the county’s dirt and gravel roads a muddy mess.

Wednesday, February 4, 2004

Letcher Circuit Court Judge Sam Wright ruled that accused murderer Kathy Walters Williams must remain in the Letcher County Jail if she cannot come up with $500,000 in cash to guarantee that she would return to court to face a murder charge in the November shooting of Forrester Caudill at Jeremiah.

.

A disabled Letcher County man was charged with operating a wheelchair while he was drunk. The man was arrested by Jenkins police officers after “weaving across Cove Avenue” in his motorized wheelchair.

.

CONSOL of Kentucky, a division of Pittsburgh, Penn.- based Consol Energy Inc., paid the Letcher County government more than $2,300 in past due garbage bills it has neglected to pay for several years.


Leave a Reply