Whitesburg KY
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The Way We Were

Clips from available Mountain Eagle pages since our founding in 1908


 

 

March 19, 1964

President Lyndon Johnson has asked Congress to approve legislation in the amount of $962.5 million as part of his declared war on poverty. The president outlined a five-point relief program including: establishing the Job Corps work-training program; providing funds to be distributed at the community level; establishing a domestic Peace Corps program; giving loans and guarantees to companies that would provide jobs; and creating the Office of Economic Opportunity to coordinate poverty-relief programs.

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Commenting on President Johnson’s war on poverty, an editorial in The Mountain Eagle says, “In eastern Kentucky, poverty means a long-established industrial population without an industry, and a minimum wage law can’t do much good if wages are not being paid at all . . . We doubt that the war on poverty will make any real headway until short-term enthusiasm is replaced by long-term boldness of thought and action.”

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Mrs. Lee Moore was named chairman of the organization campaign for a community auxiliary for Whitesburg Hospital.

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Ella Kay Hammock, a junior at Whitesburg High School and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lester Hammock, won first prize in the annual high school music contest in Pikeville. She is to go next to the state music contest, which will be televised.

March 21, 1974

Letcher, Knott and Perry counties are expected to receive $400,000 to $500,000 each from the coal severance tax, according to State Rep. Hoover Dawahare. Dawahare was ejected from the House of Representatives as he sought to amend the budget bill of Gov. Wendell Ford to include a coal severance tax. After receiving a hero’s welcome in Letcher County, he returned to Frankfort and found legislators “lining up” in support of the coal severance tax. Ford was also supporting the tax. The coal severance tax was passed by the House and is expected to be passed by the Senate before the end of the legislative session.

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Garbage piles continue to grow in Letcher County, despite efforts by the Kentucky River Garbage and Refuse Disposal District to keep up with them. The disposal district announced it is abandoning its yearold collection system in Letcher County because of financial difficulties and poor response from citizens and officials. The system will end March 31 unless the fiscal court acts to save it.

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Whitesburg City Police say they have no clues to the identity of the person or persons who poisoned 17 dogs in the city in two weeks.

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Sloane’s Pic-Pac at Isom is celebrating its first anniversary.

March 21, 1984

Just as the Letcher County Board of Education was about to announce its choice of architect for the new Whitesburg High School, the possibility arose in Frankfort that there might be no state money for a new building after all. Spokesman for Gov. Martha Layne Collins say her budget, which would put 240 million new tax dollars into Kentucky’s school systems, includes money for debt service on the new school, but if the budget does not get the legislature’s approval the money for the new school just won’t be in the state treasury.

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Three Whitesburg High School students were seriously injured when they fell from atop the L&N Railroad tunnel that passes underneath the road leading to the Whitesburg hospital.

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The Whitesburg Lady Jackets came from behind to defeat Knott Central in the 14th Region championship game. WHS junior Bridgette Co was named Athlete of the Year in Kentucky girls’ basketball. She received more votes than any other player in the state in being named to the Associated Press All-State team. WHS senior guard Sandy Brown was named All-State Honorable Mention.

March 23, 1994

Three prominent Letcher County residents have died. Roy R. Crawford Jr., 69, headed the Elkhorn-Hazard Coal Land Company, a mineral holding company, and R.R. Crawford Engineering Co., founded in 1925 by his father. Henry T. Hutton, 76, was a retired coal miner and restaurant owner and prominent community leader in the “upper end” of Letcher County. Thelma Sergent Napier, 87, was a retired vice president of the Bank of Whitesburg.

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Mountain Comprehensive Health Corporation in Whitesburg has received a gift of $63,077. The money represents funds left when a nonprofit research institute in Vienna, Va., was dissolved. The firm’s former president, Margaret W. Pratt, had worked in eastern Kentucky with MCHC and its executive, director Lois Baker.

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Woolly worms are predicting another big snowstorm before winter’s end, according to Mountain Eagle columnist Ike Adams.

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U.S. coal mining deaths hit an all-time low of 47 in 1993, according to the U.S. Mine Health and Safety Administration. Kentucky led the nation with 19 mine fatalities in 1993.

March 24, 2004

Tommy Vanover resigned from the Letcher County Board of Education this week, but said he is innocent of charges that he was caught trafficking in narcotics. Vanover was arrested by the Letcher County Sheriff ’s Office two months ago and is charged with three counts of selling the prescription narcotic hydrocodone. A fourth count accused Vanover with selling hydrocodone within 1,000 yards of a school.

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A Letcher County youth was shot in the leg Monday night, apparently after he returned home while a burglary was taking place.

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Funeral services were held in Lexington March 18 for Herbert Hoover Dawahare, 75, a former state representative from Whitesburg and a businessman whose family founded Dawahare’s department stores.

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The first-ever Kentucky Black Bear Festival will take place in Cumberland in May.


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