Whitesburg KY
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The Way We Were

Clips from available Mountain Eagle pages since our founding in 1908


 

 

Thursday, December 14, 1944

Cold weather hit Letcher County and eastern Kentucky hard this week with snow covering all sections of the region. Traffic has been at a standstill with roads closed because of ice that formed after a hard rain and was covered with snow.

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Former Neon City Clerk Maurice E. White is expected to graduate next September from the Monroe College of Optometry in Chicago and return to Letcher County to open his new practice.

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A Letcher County soldier who was killed in action in Saipan on July 9 was fatally wounded just after he had thrown a charge of TNT into a group of Japanese soldiers who had his platoon pinned down, his commanding officer says. In a letter to the mother of Marine Corps member George Blanton, the commanding officer said Blanton “threw the charge, but in bravely exposing himself the Japs shot him, killing him instantly.”

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Corporal Bernice Raleigh, 25, of Partridge, has been presented with the Purple Heart while recovering in an Army hospital in England. Raleigh was driving a halftruck when he was met with strong enemy opposition, then stopped the truck and got out to fight when a shell fragment hit him in the right arm.

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After landing in North Africa on D-Day, in Sicily on D-Day Plus 3, and in Normandy on D-Day Plus 5, Sergeant Burnett Adams, 23, of Jeremiah, is now at the 117th General Hospital in England recovering from wounds received in the left side from enemy shrapnel in fighting near Aachen, Germany. In addition to his three campaign Bronze Stars and Combat Infantry Badge, Sergeant Adams has been awarded the Purple Heart. Adams’s brother, First Lieutenant Frazier B. Adams, is in the Army Air Corps in France. They are the sons of Mrs. Loorena Adams of Jeremiah.

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After receiving the Bronze Star for meritorious service, Staff Sergeant Lloyd G. Mullins, 23, of Jenkins, was wounded by mortar fire in the Moselle Valley in northeastern France. He is now recuperating at a U.S. Army hospital in England and will be awarded the Purple Heart. Mullins’s unit spearheaded the extreme right flank drive of the Allied Forces across the Brittany Peninsula and was digging in across the Moselle River when the Germans sent up mortar and artillery fire. After Sergeant Mullins was wounded in the chest, he got himself to a Peep [a “jeep” attached to an armored regiment] and was pulled out to safety at a First Aid station. He was operated on four hours later. After remaining at a field hospital for four days, Mullins was flown to England.

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“Social Security does not make sickness or disability payments of any kind.” This statement was made today by James E. Treadway, manager of the Social Security Board’s Field Office in Hazard. “If there are changes in the law providing for such payments the public will be notified,” Treadway said.

Thursday, December 16, 1954

Brothers Clarence and Carl Harlow are being praised for showing faith in Neon and Letcher County after the opening of their beautiful new Ford Motor dealership and garage on the east end of Neon. Both are World War II veterans who attended Neon Grade School and Fleming High School.

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The mother of a World War II veteran said her son was suffering from “nervousness” before he shot himself to death in bed at age 35. Hanzel Blair was found dead in his room Monday when his mother went to call him for breakfast. Mrs. Blair [first name not included in report] said her son seemed to be himself when he went to bed Sunday night, but did ask that she put a blanket by his bed for his little dog to sleep on. Mrs. Blair said she heard a noise during the night, but did not know what had happened until she found a .22 gun by her son’s side and her son shot in the temple. Funeral services were held at Kona.

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Mrs. Jenny Coldiron returned recently from New York, where she bought Christmas and spring merchandise for the Vogue Shop in Whitesburg.

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Christmas baskets for the needy will be given away in Whitesburg again this year, but only to residents who live between Pine Mountain Junction and Caudilltown and apply for the baskets in writing and are approved by a “secret committee.”

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Shirley Ann Fields of Whitesburg and Wayne Hillman of Jenkins are among 15 Morehead State College students selected for inclusion in the 1954-55 edition of “Who’s Who in American Universities and Colleges.” Miss Fields is majoring in elementary education and is on the staff of the college yearbook, The Raconteur. Mr. Hillman is a music major and member of the MSU band and chorus.

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Kentucky State Police Commissioner Charles Oldham and Governor Lawrence Wetherby have kicked off a holiday safety campaign urging motorists not to drive while drinking alcoholic beverages, instead pouring a “one for the road” cup of coffee.

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The new Marshall’s Branch Christian and Missionary Alliance Church, located on McPeek’s Branch near Burdine, is being dedicated on Sunday, December 19. The pastor is Miss Margaret Wearley.

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Pigman Brothers Cleaners has been selected by Necchi Sewing Machine Sales Corporation to sell and repair the Necchi sewing machines. Pigman Brothers will also stock a complete line of sewing supplies and parts.

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Whitesburg Yellowjackets football star Don “Lightnin’” Caudill has been named as a guard to the Paducah Sun Democrat’s All-State football team. Whitesburg’s Buddy Fields and Robert Meade received honorable mention.

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Two former Letcher County teachers write that “education problems in our state that we thought insurmountable” was the reason for their sudden move from Letcher County to Charlestown, Indiana. Carl Breeding and Lonnie Hogg Breeding write that they were visiting Charlestown when the school superintendent there offered them jobs just a week before school started. Mr. and Mrs. Hogg apologize for their sudden move from Letcher County, but say they had only four days to sell their home here, pack and move to Indiana. “For a time we had doubts about our decision,” they write in a joint letter to the editor. “We missed familiar faces. Our loyalty to the school, the children and the teachers we had worked with so long was hard to break. The many mountain people who were already here made the transition more bearable. Eighteen Letcher Countians are in the schools surrounding us.”

Thursday, December 10, 1964

The Whitesburg City Council has voted to repeal the Right to Work ordinance, which it passed in August 1964. Russell Price, who had introduced the ordinance, made a motion to rescind it, saying it had been misinterpreted when it was first passed. He said it had not been intended as an anti-union measure but was passed in an effort to obtain a factory in Whitesburg.

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Former Letcher County Judge Arthur Dixon is going to Washington, D.C., to present a Kentucky long rifle to President Lyndon Johnson. The gun is a replica of the firearms carried by the pioneers who settled eastern Kentucky. Dixon, a master craftsman, spent about 300 hours fashioning the gun.

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United States government food stamps will go into use in Letcher County on February 1, 1965.

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”Seven Days in May” and “Surf Party” are playing at the Alene Theater in Whitesburg.

Thursday, December 12, 1974

A Mountain Eagle editorial on plunging coal prices says, “Time after time, a period of prosperity in the coalfields has brought on the opening of far too many new mines. This always has led to an overproduction, cutthroat competition, and hard times as too many mines and miners have to pay the price of the boom-bust cycle. It is about time we learned a lesson.”

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Only five persons — one a Mountain Eagle reporter — attended a meeting called to inform citizens about $312,000 in federal money available to the City of Whitesburg over five years.

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Kathy Ison, daughter of former Letcher County residents Mr. and Mrs. Delmar Ison of Arlington, Va., has been chosen Kentucky’s Cherry Blossom Princess by the Kentucky Society of Washington.

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”I guess Old Man Winter is here now for quite awhile,” writes Blair Branch correspondent Callie Blair. “We’ll have to sit back and watch snow for some time. If one can pay the electric bill, we’ll be all right then I guess. It just keeps getting higher and higher.”

Wednesday, December 19, 1984

Three Letcher County residents have been convicted on a theft of services charge for illegally obtaining cable TV signals from United Cable Systems Inc. of Hindman. The men were sentenced to serve 30 days in jail and to pay court costs.

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Don Yonts of Pine Mountain Junction was arrested when he tried to prevent a backhoe from digging on land he claims belongs to him. A construction firm was digging ditches for new Whitesburg water and sewer lines. Yonts, who has been involved in a long-running dispute with the city, called the town’s efforts to put water lines across his property “the straw that broke the camel’s back”.

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A survey of Letcher County businesses shows microwave ovens as the number one seller for Christmas. Most merchants seem to be expecting sales at or above the previous year’s level.

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The Whitesburg Lady ’Jackets defeated Dixie Heights 87-42 and Scott County High School 90-35, running their record to 3-0.

Wednesday, December 14, 1994

Jenkins has been assessed a $3,000 fine for past sewage problems. The Environmental Protection Agency put the city on notice for sewage violations in February 1988. Jenkins Mayor Robert “Pud” Shubert said the fine is a bargain: “It could have been $1 million.”

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Southwest Ohio correspondent Carson Back recalls a new 1941 Dodge pickup truck his father bought from Gene Baker Motor Co. in Hazard. The truck cost a total of $728 with payments of $42.14 a month for a year.

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The payroll of the Letcher County School System is more than $14 million a year.

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Carcassonne native Shelby Jean Caudill was honored at her retirement as school counselor in the Dawson Springs Independent School System. She had been a guidance counselor for 20 years and was named “Guidance Counselor of the Year” by the Kentucky Association of School Administrators in 1987-88.

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”Dumb and Dumber” and “Interview with a Vampire” are playing at Whitesburg Cinemas 1 & 2.

Wednesday, December 15, 2004

Isom native Mary Martin Hendron and her husband Jim of Michigan, and Mrs. Hendron’s cousins Janet and Henry Madden have created a non-profit organization called Emergency Aid for Children. The organization raises money in Michigan and supplies gifts for needy Letcher County families.

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Members of the Letcher County Central High School Marching Band have new uniforms. The uniforms, which are getting rave reviews from band members, cost $450 each.

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A group of sick Harlan County coal miners claim in a lawsuit that dust masks and respirators they used on the job were ineffective in preventing them from inhaling the airborne particles that cause black lung disease. The 12 miners, all of whom suffer from black lung, filed suit against the manufacturers and distributors of dust masks and respirators, saying they were deceived about the ability of the devices to keep them safe.

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The Letcher Eagles defeated the Hazard Bulldogs, 89- 80. The Whitesburg Lady ‘Jackets improve to 1-1 as they hosted the Knott County Central Lady Patriots.


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