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The Way We Were

Clips from available Mountain Eagle pages since our founding in 1907
In this television image, Speaker Pro Tempore Rep. Ray LaHood, R-Ill., prepares to announce the House vote of 228-206 to approve the first article of impeachment, accusing President Clinton of committing perjury before a federal grand jury Saturday, Dec. 19, 1998, in Washington. (AP Photo/APTN)

In this television image, Speaker Pro Tempore Rep. Ray LaHood, R-Ill., prepares to announce the House vote of 228-206 to approve the first article of impeachment, accusing President Clinton of committing perjury before a federal grand jury Saturday, Dec. 19, 1998, in Washington. (AP Photo/APTN)

Clinton impeached 21 years ago 

By THE HISTORY CHANNEL 

On December 19, 1998, after nearly 14 hours of debate, the House of Representatives approves two articles of impeachment against President Bill Clinton, charging him with lying under oath to a federal grand jury and obstructing justice. Clinton, the second president in American history to be impeached, vowed to finish his term.

In November 1995, Clinton began an affair with Monica Lewinsky, a 21-year-old unpaid intern. Over the course of a year and a half, the president and Lewinsky had nearly a dozen sexual encounters in the White House. In April 1996, Lewinsky was transferred to the Pentagon. That summer, she first confided in Pentagon co-worker Linda Tripp about her sexual relationship with the president. In 1997, with the relationship over, Tripp began secretly to record conversations with Lewinsky, in which Lewinsky gave Tripp details about the affair.

In December, lawyers for Paula Jones, who was suing the president on sexual harassment charges, subpoenaed Lewinsky. In January 1998, allegedly under the recommendation of the president, Lewinsky filed an affidavit in which she denied ever having had a sexual relationship with him. Five days later, Tripp contacted the office of Kenneth Starr, the Whitewater independent counsel, to talk about Lewinsky and the tapes she made of their conversations. Tripp, wired by FBI agents working with Starr, met with Lewinsky again, and on January 16, Lewinsky was taken by FBI agents and U.S. attorneys to a hotel room where she was questioned and offered immunity if she cooperated with the prosecution. A few days later, the story broke, and Clinton publicly denied the allegations, saying, “I did not have sexual relations with that woman, Ms. Lewinsky.”

In late July, lawyers for Lewinsky and Starr worked out a full-immunity agreement covering both Lewinsky and her parents, all of whom Starr had threatened with prosecution. On August 6, Lewinsky appeared before the grand jury to begin her testimony, and on August 17 President Clinton testified. Contrary to his testimony in the Paula Jones sexual-harassment case, President Clinton acknowledged to prosecutors from the office of the independent counsel that he had had an extramarital affair with Ms. Lewinsky.

In four hours of closed-door testimony, conducted in the Map Room of the White House, Clinton spoke live via closed-circuit television to a grand jury in a nearby federal courthouse. He was the first sitting president ever to testify before a grand jury investigating his conduct. That evening, President Clinton also gave a four-minute televised address to the nation in which he admitted he had engaged in an inappropriate relationship with Lewinsky. In the brief speech, which was wrought with legalisms, the word “sex” was never spoken, and the word “regret” was used only in reference to his admission that he misled the public and his family.

Less than a month later, on September 9, Kenneth Starr submitted his report and 18 boxes of supporting documents to the House of Representatives. Released to the public two days later, the Starr Report outlined a case for impeaching Clinton on 11 grounds, including perjury, obstruction of justice, witness-tampering, and abuse of power, and also provided explicit details of the sexual relationship between the president and Ms. Lewinsky. On October 8, the House authorized a wide-ranging impeachment inquiry, and on December 11, the House Judiciary Committee approved three articles of impeachment. On December 19, the House impeached Clinton.

On January 7, 1999, in a congressional procedure not seen since the 1868 impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, the trial of President Clinton got underway in the Senate. As instructed in Article 1 of the U.S. Constitution, the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (William Rehnquist at this time) was sworn in to preside, and the senators were sworn in as jurors.

Five weeks later, on February 12, the Senate voted on whether to remove Clinton from office. The president was acquitted on both articles of impeachment. The prosecution needed a two-thirds majority to convict but failed to achieve even a bare majority. Rejecting the first charge of perjury, 45 Democrats and 10 Republicans voted “not guilty,” and on the charge of obstruction of justice the Senate was split 50-50. After the trial concluded, President Clinton said he was “profoundly sorry” for the burden his behavior imposed on Congress and the American people.

THURSDAY 
DECEMBER 19, 1929 

Coal mines at Haymond continue to run night and day, mostly without interruption.

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Dr. Passmore, formerly employed by the Fitzpatrick Drug Company of Whitesburg, arrived here for a visit Monday and may be considering taking a position with Hogg Drug. He is now the druggist at one of the Liggett Drug stores in Chicago.

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Clark Day and other revenue officers conducted a raid in the Upper Rockhouse section of the county, but did not locate a still. They did report destroying a large amount of bootlegging supplies. No arrests were made.

THURSDAY 
DECEMBER 22, 1949 

The Kentucky Court of Appeals has ordered a recount in the Letcher County Clerk’s election between Republican Troy W. Frazier and Democrat Charlie Wright. A recount was originally requested by Wright, who was credited with receiving 4,979 votes to 5,038 for Frazier. However, Letcher Circuit Judge Sam Ward denied Wright’s request after Frazier claimed the county’s ballot boxes were tampered with on the Sunday night after the election. The Court of Appeals overruled Ward’s finding and ordered the recount to take place on December 27.

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In order to take care of last-minute Christmas shoppers, downtown Whitesburg businesses will be open until 8 p.m. for the rest of this week.

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Funeral services were held Tuesday for Corporal Lloyd Stacy of Carbon Glow, who was killed in an automobile accident in Washington, D.C. He was 25.

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The Elinda Ann Drive-In Theater in Whitesburg says it has installed heating in the inside seating section of the theater.

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The latest models of Dodge cars will be on display at Jordan Motor Company in Jenkins on January 4, 1950, says local dealer Ransom Jordan.

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The movie “Casablanca,” a 1942 film starting Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman and re-released in the U.S. this year, will show December 24 at the Haymond Theatre in Cromona.

THURSDAY 
DECEMBER 24, 1959 

Main Street in Whitesburg “is decidedly the prettiest and most tastefully decorated it has ever been, with very large red bells, lights and greenery,” writes columnist Virginia H. Combs. “The Bank of Whitesburg is outstanding in a very special way with profuse decoration. The Fire Department also is unusual in beauty this year. All store windows have outdone themselves to display their merchandise.”

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Coach Don Burton’s Whitesburg Yellowjackets withstood a fourth-quarter avalanche of baskets by the Letcher Eagles to win the second annual Whitesburg Invitational Tournament, 47 to 42.

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Opening of the new $312,000 Letcher High and Grade School at Jeremiah faces further delay than had been anticipated, said W.B. Hall, county school superintendent. “We may not be able to get into the new building before well into February,” Hall said, adding that the new $195,000 Fleming-Neon High School also won’t be ready until February.

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A Letcher County man and woman were found dead in a parked automobile early Tuesday. The ignition was turned on and gas tank was empty. The couple were identified as Ruby Thomas, 23, and Thomas Meade, 40. Both lived with their parents at home. Carbon monoxide poisoning caused the deaths, said Letcher County Coroner Virginia Craft.

THURSDAY 
DECEMBER 18, 1969 

Changes in Kentucky law to make it easier for miners with black law to qualify for workmen’s compensation have been proposed. The change would shift the burden of proof from the coal miner to the coal company. This would allow the miner to file for workmen’s compensation if he showed symptoms of black lung and had worked a specified number of years in a coal mine.

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“If there is any justification to the strip-mining being done in this area by Bethlehem Steel Co., it is that the county needs jobs,” says a Mountain Eagle editorial. “Yet, two former Bethlehem Steel Co. miners came into The Mountain Eagle office the other day to complain that although they are jobless former Bethlehem Steel Co. employees and are members of the United Mine Workers in good standing, they can’t get a job at any of the Steel Company’s stripping operations. ‘If you let them know you’re a member of the union, they’re sure not going to hire you’ was the comment.”

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The Jenkins Cavaliers’ record now stands at 2-3 for the season after a win over the Letcher Eagles and a narrow loss to the Hazard Bulldogs. The Cavs beat the Eagles 82-47 and lost to the Bulldogs 77-70.

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Sirloin steak is $1.18 a pound at the A&P food store. Round steak is 98 cents a pound.

THURSDAY 
DECEMBER 20, 1979 

The City of Whitesburg’s plan to assess Kentucky Power Co. several thousand dollars for operating within the city received a setback when no bid for the city’s electric utility franchise was received from the Ashland-based power company. The city tacked a four percent gross revenue fee to its franchise conditions and put the franchise up for bids last month. However Kentucky Power refused to bid on a franchise with the four percent fee, and has left it up to the Whitesburg City Council to make the next move.

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United Mine Workers miners at Beth- Elkhorn’s mines 25 and 26 walked off the job Tuesday following a dispute over the company’s recent practice of giving some workers overtime work while others are working less than 40 hours a week, miners say.

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In what students are calling “a second Watergate”, Jenkins High School basketball coach Steve Collins planted a tape recorder in the locker room where players were dressing after an exceptionally hard practice session, captured some profane remarks about the coach on the tape, and subsequently suspended those boys from the team. The Jenkins Independent Board of Education took no disciplinary action against Collins. The basketball team has not been doing any good anyway, Superintendent Alex Eversole said.

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“The Prize Fighter” starring Tim Conway and Don Knotts will play for a week at Isaac’s Alene Theatre in Whitesburg

WEDNESDAY 
DECEMBER 20, 1989 

A Franklin Circuit Judge has issued a restraining order against the Kentucky River Area Development District, blocking its attempt to regulate landfills in an eight-county area. QUC Corporation, a privately-owned waste disposal company, sought the order in an attempt to stop KRADD from setting landfill regulations. QUC is attempting to obtain a state permit to open a landfill in Owsley County that apparently would accept waste from other states.

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Funeral services for Louama Banks, 75, were held Sunday. Mrs. Banks was one of eight daughters of the late Hop and Minerva Adams Gibson. She and her sisters were known for their fine quilting and other needlework. She was the main subject of an Appalshop film, “Quilting Women”, which was shown throughout the United States. In 1970, Mrs. Banks and her sisters quilted an entire quilt as part of an exhibition at the Kentucky State Fair.

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Country music star Dwight Yoakam has joined the chorus of Kentuckians complaining that eastern Kentucky was unfairly portrayed in a CBS-TV show that focused on the region’s poverty. Yoakam, who was born in Floyd County, said he was “in great anguish” because his music and words were used in the show. The show, “48 Hours: Another America,” was set in Floyd County and included segments on coal mining, cockfighting, a teen-age wedding, spouse abuse, health problems and the county’s troubled school system.

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Lewis Hall has turned in his badge after 43 years. Hall, a two-term, Letcher County sheriff, served as jailer for one term, constable for three terms, a Fleming-Neon police officer for more than 10 years, and a deputy sheriff for the past 16 years.

WEDNESDAY 
DECEMBER 15, 1999 

Water lines for west Letcher County have been delayed for at least another year. A grant application from county has been turned down. The funds would have allowed the Letcher County Water and Sewer District to extend water lines to more than 700 houses and businesses from Jeremiah to Isom.

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HOMES, Inc., based at Goose Creek, expects to get $200,000 to $250,000 from a federal appropriation from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development Agency. HOMES, Inc. also expects to receive $250,000 more from a separate Rural Development program that is earmarked for home repair. The agency can build about six homes with the $250,000 from Rural Development. That money is lent to people who qualify under federal income guidelines.

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Residents of Fleming-Neon welcomed Santa Claus as he arrived in town aboard a float in the Christmas Parade Friday. The Marathon Gas Station float on which Santa rode won first prize in the business category in the parade.

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“Bicentennial Man” and “Walt Disney’s Toy Story” are playing at Whitesburg Cinema.

WEDNESDAY 
DECEMBER 16, 2009 

John C. Combs, 46, of Redfox, is charged with murdering Dr. Dennis S. Sandlin at Mountain Comprehensive Health Corp.’s Leatherwood/Blackey Clinic on Dec. 8 after Sandlin told him he would have to take a urine test before his request for pain medication could be addressed. Defense attorneys told Perry District Judge Leigh Anne Stephens that Combs “needs help” and should be ordered to undergo a psychiatric evaluation before his case proceeds in court. Stephens told the attorneys at until Combs is officially indicted their motion is premature.

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Participation in the “Shop with a Cop” charity conducted by the Kentucky State Police was so great this year that local school and county officials were called in to help. Every KSP trooper from Post 13 in Hazard along with several dispatchers were at the Whitesburg Walmart on Dec. 9 to help 87 children from Letcher, Knott, Leslie, Perry and Breathitt counties look for toys, clothes and electronics. Each child was allotted $125 to spend.

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On Dec. 19, Kentucky hunters will make history. The first bear hunt in modern times will take place in Harlan, Letcher and Pike counties. The hunt is open to any Kentucky resident who purchases a bear hunting permit in addition to an annual hunting license, unless license exempt.

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Bill Stanley’s kindergarten students at Fleming-Neon Elementary School wrote letters to Santa Claus. Among the items for which they asked were trucks, a castle, a four-wheeler, a remote-control car, makeup and a mirror, and a baby doll.

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